Do you have an SSL certificate for your site? If not, you may start losing traffic, as Chrome users who visit HTTP websites will now receive a ‘not secure’ warning.

Google’s goal of a making the web fully secured space started to become a reality in 2014 when they announced HTTPS as a major ranking factor. Since then, Google’s been nudging webmasters into taking the steps to secure their sites – and it’s working, as 81 of the top 100 websites are already defaulting to HTTPS.

 

Why HTTPS is Important

Websites with HTTPS denote that the website has an SSL (Secure Sockets License), which is the standard security technology for establishing an encrypted link between your website and the browser. In simpler terms, it provides a safe link for passing information between your website and your customers.

An SSL protects your business by encrypting your customers’ sensitive information such as their usernames, passwords, credit card information, and any other personal data they enter on your website.

While it has always been a good idea to have an SSL for your ecommerce website, the consequences of not having one have never been greater. Aside from the security benefits to you and your customers and the negative impact to your SEO rankings, you risk sending warning signals to your customers before they even get a chance to read the headline on your homepage, which will almost guarantee losing trust and traffic.

 

How to Enable HTTPS

Thankfully, adding an SSL to your domain is relatively easy. The first step is getting an SSL certificate. You can either purchase one from your host provider or get one for free from Let’s Encrypt, an open certificate authority provided by the Internet Authority Research Group.

If you manage a number of different domains, Google’s Lighthouse tool can make reviewing them simpler. Lighthouse is a free auditing tool designed to help developers identify which of their domains are currently still using HTTP.

 

Secure Your Site Today

The ‘not secure’ warning officially rolled out last month to all Chrome users, which is now the most popular browser, encompassing more than half of the browser market.

If you haven’t already, it’s time to make the switch to HTTPS and avoid the risk of deterring potential customers.